Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT)

The transmission of the virus from the mother to the child can occur in utero during the last weeks of pregnancy and at childbirth. In the absence of treatment, the transmission rate between the mother to the child during pregnancy, labor and delivery is 25%. However, when the mother has access to antiretroviral therapy and gives birth by caesarean section, the rate of transmission is just 1%. A number of factors influence the risk of infection, particularly the viral load of the mother at birth (the higher the viral load, the higher the risk). Breastfeeding increases the risk of transmission by 10–15%. This risk depends on clinical factors and may vary according to the pattern and duration of breast-feeding.

Studies have shown that antiretroviral drugs, caesarean delivery and formula feeding reduce the chance of transmission of HIV from mother to child. Current recommendations state that when replacement feeding is acceptable, feasible, affordable, sustainable and safe, HIV-infected mothers should avoid breast-feeding their infant. However, if this is not the case, exclusive breast-feeding is recommended during the first months of life and discontinued as soon as possible. In 2005, around 700,000 children under 15 contracted HIV, mainly through MTCT, with 630,000 of these infections occurring in Africa. Of the children currently living with HIV, 2 million (almost 90%) live in sub-Saharan Africa.

Prevention strategies are well known in developed countries, however, recent epidemiological and behavioral studies in Europe and North America have suggested that a substantial minority of young people continue to engage in high-risk practices and that despite HIV/AIDS knowledge, young people underestimate their own risk of becoming infected with HIV. However, transmission of HIV between intravenous drug users has clearly decreased, and HIV transmission by blood transfusion has become quite rare in developed countries.

14 comments:

  1. Thanks for this. I'm going to send to a few other friends.

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  2. this site is heavily filled with adds:P hehe
    also mindfuck post

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  3. is that why it's so bad in parts of africa?? interesting

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  4. very intersesting/sad I wish we could find a cure already

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  5. It's really horrible that a disease of this magnitude can be transferred without knowledge of the mother.

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  6. Amazing information, I can't stop reading. I don't feel as if I was taught enough about Aids as a kid even though it is so prevalent in modern society.

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  7. I know - this post is very informative. I hope that a cure is nearing. It's actually what I hope to study during University, Pharmaceutical Medicine employed by Chemical Enginnering.

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  8. excellent information i love reading it

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  9. interesting post.
    Education is the key to preventing most of these deaths.

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  10. Great info, but this post made me sad :X

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  11. useful, informative, it is important

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